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Welcome to Philip West Prints .com , the place where you can find all of the superb aviation and naval art prints by Philip West, both from SWA and theearlier much sought after Military Gallery publications.Philip West Prints is operated by Cranston Fine Arts The military and Aviaiton print company to showcase the superb aviaiton art of the artist and is not connected to Philip West himself. Theprints are organised by category so you can find what you are looking for easily, or just browse the various galleries, presenting artworks by Philip West, depicting many aircraft, including Spitfires, Lancasters, Flying Fortresses, Tornados, Stirlings, Concorde, Mustangs, Skuas, F-18s, Phantoms, and many more.


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Highly recommended rare aviation art prints by Philip West, signed by major British and American Aces. Last few prints remaining - Click Image for Details
Battle Line : On the 6th June 1944 the invasion of Normandy commenced. The RAF was, of course, a major combatant and formed part of a dedicated Allied force tasked with freeing Europe. VE Day finally signalled the end of hostilities on the 8th May 1945.  These rare prints are signed by RAF Ace Air Vice Marshal Johnnie Johnson CB, CBE, DSO**, DFC*
Southern Patrol : During the battle of Britain, 609 Squadron (PR) and 152 Squadron (UM) were pitting themselves against the Luftwaffe. 609 based at Middle Wallop near Andover and 152 operating from Warmwell were tasked with protecting part of 10 Groups Southern Sector.  These last few prints were personally signed by distinguished Battle of Britain ace Group Captain Sir Hugh Dundas CBE DSO DFC
Silver Kite : Part of the Philip West American Jet fighter aviaiton print collection. 10th May 1972. Lt. Curt Dose together with his RIO, LCDR Jim McDevitt line up their F-4J Phantom prior to landing on the USS Constellation following their first successful target CAP of the day. During this mission they claimed a MiG-21F after a ultra-low level supersonic flight over the North Vietnamese airfield of Kep, northeast of Hanoi.
Dallas Doll : Signed by two great American Mustang pilots, Bud Anderson and William B Overstreet.  North American P51D-NA15 Mustang 414495 Dallas Doll 352nd Fighter Squadron, 353rd Fighter Group, 8th Air Force. American designed and built, British inspired and, later, powered, the Mustang turned into arguably the finest WW11 long-range fighter ever constructed. The Mustang, developed from the Prototype NA73X, was manufactured in large quantities, with an impressive final total of 15,586 aircraft. Of these 13,600 were powered by the British, Rolls Royce designed Merlin engine.
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Aviation Print Packs
SR-71 Blackbird Prints by Stan Stokes and Philip West.
The Untouchable by Philip West.
The Untouchable by Philip West.
Way Ahead of its Time by Stan Stokes.

Way Ahead of its Time by Stan Stokes.
Save 8!
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Pack 713. Pack of two Dambusters signed prints by Philip West.
Operation Chastise - The Dambusters by Philip West.
Operation Chastise - The Dambusters by Philip West.
Every Second Counts - The Dambusters by Philip West.
Every Second Counts - The Dambusters by Philip West.
Save 215!
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Vulcan Bomber Prints by Nicolas Trudgian and Philip West.
Vulcan Thunder by Nicolas Trudgian.

Vulcan Thunder by Nicolas Trudgian.
Delta Lady by Philip West.
Delta Lady by Philip West.
Save 105!
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Mosquito Aircraft Prints by Philip West and Robert Taylor.
Time To Go by Philip West.

Time To Go by Philip West.
Night Intruder by Robert Taylor.

Night Intruder by Robert Taylor.
Save 150!
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Flying Fortress Aircraft Prints by Philip West and Tim Fisher.
Nine O Nine by Philip West.

Nine O Nine by Philip West.
Scheherazade by Tim Fisher.

Scheherazade by Tim Fisher.
Save 115!
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Oberleutnant Adolf Glunz (deceased)

Adolf Glunz served with 4/JG-52 on both the Channel Coast and then in Russia. Returning to the English Channel with II./JG-25 he became one of the most successful fighter pilots on the Western Front. Adolf Glunz saw combat continuously right up to the war end and, remarkably, was never shot down or wounded in over 574 missions, many whilst flying the Fw190. Awarded the Knight's Cross in 1943, he acheived a personal score of 71 victories. He died 1st August 2002.

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All Our Latest Aviation Releases : 

 Schneider CA1 Tanks of the French tenth army spearhead the successful counter offensive against the German army on the river Marne. Overhead a tenacious Junkers JI artillery spotter dogs their tracks. The Second Battle of the Marne, though not an overwhelming victory, spelt the end of German successes on the Western front, and a turning point for the allies.

Tanks on the Marne - France, 18th July 1918 by David Pentland. (PC)
 An SAS team is picked up by a U.S. Army Special Forces Blackhawk helicopter after a successful operation against the Taliban.

Extraction - Afghanistan 2011 by David Pentland. (PC)
The Luftwaffe had done everything in its power to pummel London into submission but they failed. By the end of September 1940 their losses were mounting. For weeks since the early days of September, London had been the main target for the Luftwaffe and during that time Luftwaffe High Command had grown increasingly despondent as their losses steadily mounted. Far from being on the brink of collapse RAF Fighter Command, though vastly outnumbered, had shown an incredible resilience. The fighting had reached a dramatic climax on Sunday 15th September when, bloodied and bruised, the Luftwaffe had lost the upper hand on a day of intense combat that had culminated with a humiliating retreat. Almost every day that had passed since then had seen the Luftwaffe do everything in its power to pummel London and regain the initiative, but the daylight raids were becoming increasingly costly. On Friday 27th September, 80 days after the Battle of Britain had officially begun, the Luftwaffe came once more, this time concentrating on the fastest bombers they had - Ju88s and Bf110s. And they came in force, principally targeting London and Bristol. Anthony Saunders' superb painting depicts one of these raids, this time by bombers from KG77 as they head over the Medway Estuary, east of the City of London, in an attempt to attack the capital's warehouses and docks. Among the many units defending the capital that day was 92 Squadron from Biggin Hill and Anthony portrays the Spitfire of Pilot Officer Geoffrey Wellum in his dramatic piece. With a deft flick of the rudder Wellum banks his fighter away to port seconds after sharing in the destruction of a Ju88. It was just one of more than 50 German aircraft destroyed by the RAF during the day.
Decisive Blow by Anthony Saunders.
 Despite having sight in just one eye, Major Edward Mick Mannock was to become one of the most decorated and celebrated aces of World War 1, bringing down an official 61 enemy aircraft in just eighteen months before himself being brought down in flames by enemy ground fire. He was reluctant to add shared kills to his tally, so his actual total of victories is recorded at 73. His decorations include the VC, DSO and 2 Bars, MC and Bar and he is depicted here diving on enemy aircraft in SE5a D278 of 74 Sqn in April, 1918.

Major Edward Mannock by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Mystery still surrounds just why Manfred von Richthofen risked so much in chasing the novice pilot Wilfred Wop May into Allied-occupied territory on the morning of Sunday, 21st April 1918, but it was to be his last flight, this error of judgement costing him his life. Von Richthofen had broken from the main fight involving Sopwith Camels of 209 Sqn to chase Mays aircraft, but found himself under attack from the Camel of Captain Roy Brown. All three aircraft turned and weaved low along the Somme River, the all red Triplane coming under intense fire from the ground as well as from Browns aircraft. No one knows exactly who fired the crucial bullet, but Manfred von Richthofens aircraft was seen to dive suddenly and impact with the ground. The Red Baron was dead and his amazing run of 80 victories was over. The painting shows Mays aircraft (D3326) in the extreme distance, pursued by DR.1 (425/17) and Browns Camel (B7270) in the foreground.

Captain Roy Brown engages the Red Baron, 21st April 1918 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 With a final 47 victories to his credit, Robert Alexander Little was one of the highest-scoring British aces of World War 1, beginning his career with the famous No 8 (Naval) Squadron in 1916, flying Sopwith Pup N5182, as shown here. On 21st April 1917, he was attacked and shot down by six aircraft of Jasta Boelke, Little being thrown from the cockpit of his Sopwith Camel on impact with the ground. As the German aircraft swooped in to rake the wreckage with machine gun fire, Little pulled his Webley from its holster and began returning fire before being assisted by British infantry with their Lewis guns. Such was the character of this great pilot who finally met his death whilst attacking Gotha bombers on the night of 27th May 1918.

Captain Robert Little by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 The exploits of the partnership of McKeever and Powell in their 11 Squadron Bristol F.2B made them perhaps the most celebrated of all the Bristol Fighter crews, McKeever himself becoming the highest scoring exponent of this classic type with a closing tally of 31 victories. Powell was to secure a further 19 kills before both were withdrawn from front line service to Home Establishment in January 1918. Whilst on a lone patrol above enemy lines in November 1917, their aircraft (A7288) was attacked by two German two-seaters and seven Albatross scouts, four of which were sent to the ground through a combination of superb airmanship and outstanding gunnery. The remaining German aircraft continued to give chase until the F.2B was down to less than 20ft above the British trenches, at which point the Germans broke off their attack and fled.

Captain Andrew McKeever and 2nd Lieutenant Leslie Powell by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 The Sopwith Dolphin was a radical departure from previous Sopwith design philosophies, embodying a reverse-stagger on the wings, a water-cooled Hispano-Suiza engine and an unusual, but highly popular positioning of the cockpit which gave the pilot unprecedented views. One exponent of this purposeful looking machine was Canadian Major A D Carter who claimed many of his 31 victories flying the Dolphin. He is shown here sending an Albatross to the ground on 8th May 1918 whilst flying C4017. Carter was himself shot down soon after became a prisoner of war. He was killed in 1919 whilst test flying a Fokker D.VII at Shoreham, Sussex.

Major Albert Carter by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

A selection of current half price aviation prints : 

 A Catalina flying boat of the Royal Air Force shown at anchor in the Indian Ocean at night.

Black Cat, Indian Ocean, 1944 by David Pentland. (GS)
 The highest scoring allied ace of World War 1, Rene Fonck was born on 27th March 1894 and spent his early military service with the 11th Regiment of Engineers before being sent for flying instruction in the spring of 1915. Almost as soon as he had been assigned to combat duties, he began to score and was posted to Groupe de Combat No12, the famous Storks where a combination of superb airmanship and deadly accurate gunnery ensured that his victory tally continued to grow. By the end of the war, Fonck was credited with a commendable 75 confirmed victories, but it is likely that he may have been responsible for a further possible 69 kills, which would have taken his total score to 144 - 64 more than Manfred von Richthofen, the notorious Red Baron. Capitaine Rene Fonck is shown in one of his Spad S.XIIIs chasing down a DFW C-Type.

Capitaine Rene Fonck by Ivan Berryman. (P)
 With Italys entry into WW II on June 10, 1940, the epic two-and-one-half-year siege of Malta began. Symbolizing the defiant resistance of the people and defenders of that tiny island, the legend of Faith, Hope, and Charity grew from a handful of Gloster Sea Gladiators which initially comprised Maltas sole aerial defense. Until the arrival of the more modern Hawker Hurricanes, these obsolescent biplanes fought the Regia Aeronautica alone in the skies above Malta. Only six or seven Gladiators were assembled from the shipment of eighteen crated aircraft which had been delivered by the HMS Glorious. Others were utilized for spare parts, and three had been dispatched, still crated, to Egypt. Though hugely outnumbered, the defenders fought on, raising the morale of the citizens of Malta, and denying the Italians mastery of the sky. Suffering from a constant shortage of spare parts, tools and equipment, the devoted ground support crews were never able to keep more than three Gladiators operational at any point in time. Only one of these Gladiators was totally lost in aerial combat, and the sole surviving aircraft was presented to the people of Malta, and today stands in their National War Museum as a proud symbol of courage and endurance. In Stan Stokes painting, a Sea Gladiator, piloted by Flight Lt. James Pickering, tangles with a Fiat C.R. 42 over Malta in 1940 while an Italian Savoia S.79 tri-engined bomber passes by in the background. The Gloster Gladiator represented the zenith of development of the classic biplane fighter aircraft, a design formula which characterized an entire era from WW I until the advent of the monoplane fighter just before WW II. Glosters naval model of the Gladiator was equipped with a Bristol Mercury VIIIA engine providing a maximum speed of 253 MPH, a rate of climb of 2300 feet per minute, an operational ceiling of 32,200 feet, and a range of 415 miles. The Gladiator was armed with four .303 inch Browning machine guns, and incorporated several advanced features including an enclosed cockpit and wing flaps. One top RAF ace, Sqd. Ldr. Pattle, attained eleven victories flying the Gladiator. A total of 527 Gladiators were produced, and the aircraft served in twelve different countries. The Italians were overly persistent in their emphasis on biplane fighters, stemming from their successes with these highly maneuverable machines during the Spanish Civil War. Employing distinctive Warren-truss type interplane bracing the C.R. 42 was powered by a Fiat A74 R.C. 38 engine providing a maximum speed of 274 MPH and a range of 485 miles. The C.R. 42 was more lightly armed than the Gladiators it opposed, possessing only two 12.7mm Breda machine guns. The C.R 42 served on all of Italys fronts including North and East Africa, France, Britain, the Balkans, and Russia. Exported to Hungary, Sweden and Belgium, the C.R. 42 ironically served alongside the Gladiator in other theaters of operation during WW II.
Faith Hope and Charity by Stan Stokes. (C)
The fourth attack on the Mohne Dam led by Sqd Ldr H M Young, piloting AJ-A (ED877/G) In the background to his starboard side is Flt Lt H B Martin, flying AJ-P (ED909/G) who was drawing fire away from the attacking aircraft by flashing his identification lights and turning on the spotlight altitude indicators. Wing Cdr G P Gibsons aircraft is out of sight, engaging enemy fire at the far side of the dam wall. The bomb was observed to make three good bounces and exploded on contact exactly as Barnes Wallis had planned, generating a vast column of water. Although it was not obvious at that instant, this was the attack which succeeded in breaching the dam. However, it was not until the next attack by Flt D J H Maltby that it was realised that the dam was crumbling. The code word sent out by Young signified; Goner (bomb released) 7 (exploded in contact with the dam) 8 (no apparent breach) A (Mohne dam) Youngs aircraft was lost with all lives on its return to Scampton possibly around 02.58 near Castricum-ann-Zee, north of Ijmuiden.
Goner 78A - The Dambusters Raid by Tim Fisher (GL)
 A Chinook performs an MERT pick up with the force protection of two Army Air Corps Apache helicopters.

MERT, Sangin Valley, Helmand Province, Afghanistan by Graeme Lothian. (GS)
 Based upon the design of an earlier 1913 racing biplane, Aviatik AG were able to introduce their B.1 into military service almost at the outbreak of World War 1, the type proving to be a useful reconnaissance machine during the early stages of the conflict. As with most B type aircraft of this time, the Aviatik B.1 was unarmed and carried an observer in the forward cockpit. Power was provided by a Mercedes D.1 inline engine whose large radiators were fitted to the port side of the fuselage, just above the lower wing. There is no record of exactly how many B.1s were constructed.

Aviatik B.1 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
 F-4C Phantom II of Colonel Robin Olds of the 8th Tactical Fighter Wing, January 1967.

Colonel Robin Olds by Ivan Berryman. (P)
 Bf109 G2 of Major Gunther Rall pursues and downs an unidentified Soviet aircraft over the Caucasus, Russia, early Autumn 1943. Rall went on to become the third highest scoring ace of all time, with 275 victories in only 621 missions.

No Escape by David Pentland. (GL)

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Lancaster Legend by Philip West. (AP)
Lancaster Legend by Philip West. (AP)
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Philip West is recognised as one of the world's finest aviation artists. Collectors of his original oil paintings span the globe, many waiting patiently for his next breathtaking canvas to appear. With some twenty-eight limited editions behind him, a packed painting and personal appearance schedule both in the UK and America ahead, Philip's popularity is soaring.

Noted for his passion for detail, Philip has won many accolades for his paintings, not the least of which was the prestigious Duane Whitney Award for Excellence at the 1997 American Society of Aviation Artists Exhibition.

His work is inspired by and reflects his fascination for aircraft through the ages. Philip's knowledge of aircraft and the accuracy of his work combine to record a moment in history so perfectly, that both collectors and admirers of his work are able to feel a real sense of the excitement and drama that his work portrays.

When he is not on location or attending special events Philip lives and works with his wife Alice, and family, in a beautiful village deep in the Wiltshire countryside.

 

Aviation History Timeline : 25th September
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
25September1916Kurt Wintgens, a WW1 Ace with 18.00 victories, died on this day
25September1918Martin Dehmisch, a WW1 Ace with 10.00 victories, died on this day
25September1940Australian Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt K. C. Holland of 152 Squadron, was Killed.
25September1940British Battle of Britain pilot, AC2. R. I. Payne of 23 Squadron, was Killed.
25September1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. L R. Karasek of 23 Squadron, was Killed.
25September1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. M. Gray of 72 Squadron, was Killed.
25September1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. W. G. Silver of 152 Squadron, was Killed.
25September1940New Zealand Battle of Britain pilot, P/O E. Orgias of 23 Squadron, was Killed.
25September1941Oberleutnant Horst Carganico of 6./Jagdgeschwader 5 was awarded the Knight's Cross
25September2010Knight's Cross recipient Gunter Kilian of 2./Schlachtgeschwader 77 died on this day

 

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Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email: cranstonorders - at - outlook.com



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