Phlip West Prints . com

 

All Philip West aviation art in one place and great print prices.
Customer Helpline (UK) : 01436 820269

You currently have no items in your basket


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Welcome to Philip West Prints .com , the place where you can find all of the superb aviation and naval art prints by Philip West, both from SWA and theearlier much sought after Military Gallery publications.Philip West Prints is operated by Cranston Fine Arts The military and Aviaiton print company to showcase the superb aviaiton art of the artist and is not connected to Philip West himself. Theprints are organised by category so you can find what you are looking for easily, or just browse the various galleries, presenting artworks by Philip West, depicting many aircraft, including Spitfires, Lancasters, Flying Fortresses, Tornados, Stirlings, Concorde, Mustangs, Skuas, F-18s, Phantoms, and many more.


Valuations

Classified Ads Terms and Conditions Shipping Info Contact Details
Highly recommended rare aviation art prints by Philip West, signed by major British and American Aces. Last few prints remaining - Click Image for Details
Battle Line : On the 6th June 1944 the invasion of Normandy commenced. The RAF was, of course, a major combatant and formed part of a dedicated Allied force tasked with freeing Europe. VE Day finally signalled the end of hostilities on the 8th May 1945.  These rare prints are signed by RAF Ace Air Vice Marshal Johnnie Johnson CB, CBE, DSO**, DFC*
Southern Patrol : During the battle of Britain, 609 Squadron (PR) and 152 Squadron (UM) were pitting themselves against the Luftwaffe. 609 based at Middle Wallop near Andover and 152 operating from Warmwell were tasked with protecting part of 10 Groups Southern Sector.  These last few prints were personally signed by distinguished Battle of Britain ace Group Captain Sir Hugh Dundas CBE DSO DFC
Silver Kite : Part of the Philip West American Jet fighter aviaiton print collection. 10th May 1972. Lt. Curt Dose together with his RIO, LCDR Jim McDevitt line up their F-4J Phantom prior to landing on the USS Constellation following their first successful target CAP of the day. During this mission they claimed a MiG-21F after a ultra-low level supersonic flight over the North Vietnamese airfield of Kep, northeast of Hanoi.
Dallas Doll : Signed by two great American Mustang pilots, Bud Anderson and William B Overstreet.  North American P51D-NA15 Mustang 414495 Dallas Doll 352nd Fighter Squadron, 353rd Fighter Group, 8th Air Force. American designed and built, British inspired and, later, powered, the Mustang turned into arguably the finest WW11 long-range fighter ever constructed. The Mustang, developed from the Prototype NA73X, was manufactured in large quantities, with an impressive final total of 15,586 aircraft. Of these 13,600 were powered by the British, Rolls Royce designed Merlin engine.
Navigation Menus

 

Aircraft
Search
Squadron
Search
Signature
Index
Artist
Index
SPECIAL OFFERS
Product Search         
CLICK HERE FOR A FULL LIST OF ALL PHILIP WEST PRINTS BY TITLE
 


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

 

Aviation Print Packs
Pilot Signed (Billy Drake) Spitfire Prints by Philip West and Anthony Saunders.
Spitfires Over the Needles by Philip West. (AP)

Spitfires Over the Needles by Philip West. (AP)
Maltese Falcons by Anthony Saunders. (C)

Maltese Falcons by Anthony Saunders. (C)
Save 200!
-----------
McDonnell Douglas F-18 Aviation Prints by Philip West and Michael Rondot.
Chippy Ho by Philip West.

Chippy Ho by Philip West.
Hornet the Hunter by Michael Rondot.
Hornet the Hunter by Michael Rondot.
Save 280!
-----------
Flying Fortress Aircraft Prints by Philip West and Simon Smith.
Those Golden Moments by Philip West.

Those Golden Moments by Philip West.
The Veteran by Simon Smith.

The Veteran by Simon Smith.
Save 135!
-----------
Blackbird SR-71 Aviation Prints by Philip West.
Habu 972 at Mach 3.0 by Philip West.
Habu 972 at Mach 3.0 by Philip West.
The Untouchable by Philip West.
The Untouchable by Philip West.
Save 55!
-----------
Avro Lancaster Bomber Prints by Philip West and Ivan Berryman.
Lancaster Legend by Philip West.
Lancaster Legend by Philip West.
Avro Lancaster B.1 by Ivan Berryman. (D)

Avro Lancaster B.1 by Ivan Berryman. (D)
Save 35!
-----------

THE BIG SALE!

Exclusive special offers on Philip West prints

Only available when you purchase from this website

Click HERE to see the current offers!

FEATURED SIGNATURE



Alan Rawlinson (deceased)

Alan Rawlinson was born on 31st July 1918 in Fremantle, Western Australia. Alan Rawlinson was a keen aviator and at the age of 19 in 1937 received a private pilots licence while learning to fly in DH60 Gypsy Moths. In 1938 Alan Rawlinson enlisted in the RAAF and in 1939 graduated as a Pilot Officer and was posted to 3 Squadron at Richmond, New South.Wales. When World War ll broke out 3 squadron was posted to the Western Desert and Pilot Offcier Alan Rawlinson was involved in combat flying in September 1940 to April 1941. From May 1941 to August 1941 he was stationed at Cyprus then returning to the Western Desert , Rawlinson became commanding Officer of 3 squadron soon after. It was while he served in the western desert that Rawlinson received the DFC. He returned to Australia in 1942 as Chief Flying Instructor at Mildura and was promoted to Squadron Commander and Wing Leader in 1943 and served in the Pacific campaign. In 1947 Alan Rawlinson transferred to the RAF flying the new jet aircraft Vampires and Meteors, finally retiring in 1961. Alan Rawlinson passed away 28th August 2007.

Click for artwork signed by this person

Other Aviation Artists

Featured Aircraft



Albatros D.III



Click for artwork of this aircraft

All Our Latest Aviation Releases : 

 The daylight raid on Tokyo, led by Lt Col James H. Doolittle on Sunday 18 April 1942, has rightfully entered the history books as one of the most daring and courageous operations of the Second World War. On that day, in mid ocean, Doolittle had launched his B-25 Mitchell bomber from the heaving, spray-soaked flight deck of an aircraft carrier, a deck too short to land on, and flown on to bomb Tokyo. He knew there would be no return to the USS Hornet, either for him or the 15 heavily laden B-25s behind him, for this was a feat never before attempted, and for every crew member the mission was a one-way ticket. Yet, under the leadership of Jimmy Doolittle, they all dared to survive. The mission for the 16 bombers was to bomb industrial targets in Tokyo and surrounding areas, to slow production of strategic war material, then fly on to land in the part of south-west China that was still in the hands of friendly Nationalist forces. All being well, the mission would be so unexpected it would plant the first seeds of doubt into enemy minds. It worked – the Japanese were forced to quickly divert hundreds of aircraft, men and equipment away from offensive operations to the defence of their homeland. There was, however, another reason behind the Doolittle's raid – to lift the morale of an American public devastated by the attack on Pearl Harbor four months earlier. And the success of the mission provided the boost that was needed. If any had doubted America's resolve in the face of uncertainty, the courage, determination and heroism displayed by Lt Col Doolittle and his band of aviators restored their determination. Although it might take years, and the price would be high, America and her allies understood that the fight could, and would, be won. Commissioned to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the Doolittle Tokyo Raid the painting portrays the dramatic moment that Lt Col Jimmy Doolittle lifts his B-25 off the pitching deck of the USS Hornet. Having timed his launch to perfection he climbs steeply away, ready to adjust his compass bearing for a direct line to Tokyo. On the sodden deck behind him the crews of the remaining 15 aircraft, whose engines are warmed, ready and turning, will quickly follow their commanding officer into the murky sky.

Destination Tokyo by Anthony Saunders.
  Seen here in company with other 485 Sqn machines, Spitfire Mk.IXc ML407 is depicted over the Normandy beaches shortly after D-Day.  Flown by New Zealander Fl Lt Johnnie Houlton, this aircraft claimed a Ju.88 on 6th June and shared in the destruction of another on the same day.  Coded 'V' in honour of his wife, Vickie, ML407 is still flying today, now converted to a two-seater and regularly displayed by Carolyn Grace.

Guardians of the Beaches by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Despite crippling damage to their Lancaster ED925 (G), the crew of AJ-M continued to press home their attack on the Mohne Dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943. With both port engines ablaze, Flt Lt J V Hopgood forced his blazing aircraft on, releasing the Upkeep bomb just precious seconds too late to strike the dam, the mine instead bouncing over the wall and onto the power station below with devastating results. ED925 attempted to recover from the maelstrom, but the fuel fire was too intense and the aircraft was tragically lost, just two of her crew managing to escape the impact to spend the rest of the war as PoWs.

No Way Back by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
  Following the successful attack on the Mohne dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943, three Lancasters of 617 Sqn turned their attention to the Eder, some twelve minutes flying time away, accompanied by Wing Commander Guy Gibson to oversee the next attack. After several aborted attempts to obtain the correct height and direction for their bomb run by Flight Lieutenant Shannon (AJ-L) and  Squadron Leader H E Maudslay (AJ-Z), Gibson called in Maudslay to try again. During his second approach, he released his Upkeep bomb too late. It struck the top of the dam wall and bounced back into the air where it exploded right behind Maudslay's aircraft, lighting up the entire valley and causing considerable damage to the aircraft that had dropped it. Despite what must have been crippling damage, AJ-Z did manage to limp away from the scene and begin the return journey, but Maudslay and all his crew were sadly lost when their aircraft was shot down by flak at Emmerich-Klein-Netterdn. The Eder was finally successfully breached by Pilot Officer Les Knight's aircraft, ED912(G), AJ-N, which returned safely.

Tragedy at the Eder by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Flying low across the North Sea en route to the Sorpe Dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943 as part of Operation Chastise, Flying Officer Geoff Rice's Lancaster ED936(G) clipped a large wave, ripping the Upkeep bomb from its mountings and pitching the aircraft into the sea. Somehow, in just a split second, Rice managed to haul AJ-H back into the air, but the aircraft had ingested a huge amount of water and, as Rice put his Lancaster into a climb to head back to Scampton, rear gunner Sgt S Burns and his turret were almost swept away as the water rushed to the back of the aircraft. AJ-H returned to Scampton otherwise unscathed and took no further part in the Dams Raids.

A Lucky Escape by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 En route to the Ruhr Dams on the night of 16/17 May 1943, P/O W C Townsend, demonstrating great skill, flew his aircraft, ED886(G) 'O'- Orange below tree-top height through a forest firetrap on his way to the Ennepe Dam, a feat carried out by moonlight alone.  AJ-O made it successfully to its target where the Upkeep bomb was observed to hit the dam, but with no effect, before returning safely to base the following morning.

Undetected by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
  This was the moment when the massive Möhne dam was finally breached on the night of 16th-17th May 1943 during the top secret Operation Chastise. The specially-converted Lancaster B MkIII of Fl/Lt David Maltby ED906(G) AJ-J roars between the towers of the dam, having released the Upkeep bouncing bomb that would ultimately cause a cascade of water to flood into the valley below. Fl/Lt Harold Martin's identical aircraft, ED909(G) AJ-P can be seen off Maltby's port wing with all of its light ablaze, drawing enemy fire from the attacking bomber.

Dambusters - Moment of Truth by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 The Lancaster B MkIII of Flt Lt J V Hopgood was the second aircraft to make an attempt at breaching the Möhne Dam on the night of 16/17th of May 1943.    Already damaged by flak en route to their target, the embattled Lancaster ED925(G) (AJ-M) encountered intense flak and 20mm fire from the shore and from the towers of the dam itself. Flying Officer Gregory's front gun turret had taken the full force of the flak burst during the journey, killing him instantly, and Hopgood himself was almost certainly wounded in the same explosion.  Nevertheless, they pressed home their attack but, just moments from the release of the Upkeep bomb, both of Hopgood's port engines took direct hits and burst into flames, and other rounds ripped through the starboard wing. Perhaps distracted by the sudden conflagration, Hopgood's aircraft released its bomb just seconds too late to be effective.  The bomb bounced over the dam wall, landing on the power station below where it exploded with devastating results.  With blazing fuel now engulfing the wing of his crippled aircraft, Hopgood climbed to about 500ft where the wing failed, sending ED925 into a dive from which it would never recover. By jumping clear, clutching their parachutes just moments before impact, two of her crew survived to become prisoners of war.

Bravest of the Brave by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

A selection of current half price aviation prints : 

 Hurricanes of No.3 Squadron on patrol. MkIIc variants, characterised by the four Hispano or Oerlikon cannon housed in the wings. No 3 Sqn were engaged in night fighter activities during the Spring of 1941.

3 Squadron Hurricanes by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
 Portsmouth August 26th 1940, the lone spitfire of Squadron Leader Sandy Johnstone breaks the ranks and picks off one of the menacing Heinkels only to encounter an equally determined attack from a BF109. <br><br>We were brought to readiness in the middle of lunch and scrambled to intercept mixed bag of 100+ Heinkel IIIs and DO 17s approaching Portsmouth from the South.  The controller did a first class job and positioned us one thousand feet above the target. with the sun  behind us, allowing us to spot the raiders from a long way off. No escorting Messchersmitts were in sight at the time, although a sizable force was to turn up soon after. then something strange happened.  I was about to give a ticking off to our chaps for misusing the R/T when I realised I was listening to German voices. It appeared we were both using the same frequency and, although having no knowledge of the language it sounded from the monotonous flow of the conversation that they were unaware of our presence. as soon  as we dived towards the leading formation, however we were assailed immediately to loud shouts of  Achtung Spitfuern Spitfuern! as our bullets began to take their toll.  In spite of having taken jerry by surprise our bag was only six, with others claimed as damaged, before the remainder dived for cloud cover and turned for home. In the meantime the escorting fighters were amongst us when two of our fellows were badly shot up. Hector Maclean stopped a cannon shell on his cockpit, blowing his foot off above the ankle although, in spite of his grave injuries, he managed to fly his spitfire back to Tangmere to land with wheels retracted. Cyril Babbages aircraft was also badly damaged in the action. forcing him to abandon it and take to his parachute. He was ultimately picked up by a rescue launch and put ashore at Bognor, having suffered only minor injuries.  I personally accounted for one Heinkel III in the action (Sandy Johnson) . <br><br>No. 602 City of Glasgow auxiliary squadron was a household name long before WWII began. It had been the first auxiliary squadron to get into the air in 1925, two of its members, Lord Clydeside and David McIntyre  were the first to conquer Mount Everest in 1933, the squadron sweeped the board in gunnery and bombing in 1935, beating the regular squadrons at their own game. It was the first auxiliary Squadron to be equipped with Spitfire Fighters as far back as March 1939 and it was the first squadron to shoot down the first enemy aircraft on British soil.  The squadron moved south from Drem airfield in East Lothian on August 14th 1940 to relieve the already battered no. 145 squadron at Westhampnett, Tangmeres satelitte station in Sussex. The squadron suffered 5 casualties during the battle. The squadron remained at Westhampnett until December 1940 to be replaced by no. 610 auxiliary airforce squadron. No 602 squadron itself remained active up until 1957 when it was put into mothballs.

Gauntlet by Anthony Saunders (P)
 Under the watchful eye of his more experienced tutor a trainee pilot gets his first taste of the Spitfire Mk.IIa, airborne from Tangmere early in 1941. the nearest aircraft is P7856 (YT-C) which enjoyed a long career, surviving until 1945.

The Fledgling by Ivan Berryman. (E)
 Two Fairey Firefly F Mk1s of 1770 NAS embarked on HMS Indefatigable are shown outbound on Operation Meridian I on 24th January 1945.  The nearest aircraft is DT947, flown by Vin Redding.  Operation Meridian was a series of two air attacks on Japanese-held oil refineries at Palembang on Sumatra.  The huge aviation fuel output of these refineries was reduced to only a quarter of their output after the two raids on the 24th and 29th January 1945.

Fairey Firefly F Mk.Is of 1770 Sqn, 1945 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
 Erich Lowenhardt was already the holder of the Knights Cross 1st and 2nd Class for acts of bravery even before becoming a pilot. After serving as an observer for a year, he was eventually posted to Jasta 10 in 1917 where he immediately began to score victories, sending down balloons and enemy aircraft at a fearsome rate. He was appointed Commander of Jasta 10 one week before his 21st birthday, making him one the youngest pilots to rise to such a rank in the German Army Air Service. He continued to increase his score steadily throughout 1917 and 1918, but was involved in a mid-air collision with a Jasta 11 aircraft on 10th August. Lowenhardt elected to abandon his aircraft, but his parachute failed to deploy and the young ace fell to his death. He flew a number of aircraft, but this yellow-fuselaged Fokker D.VII was his most distinctive and is believed to be the aircraft in which he was killed. His final victory total was 54.

Oberleutnant Erich Lowenhardt by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
 Flight Lieutenant Ian <i>Widge</i> Gleed is depicted in his personal Hurricane 1 P2798 (LK-A) of 87 Sqn shooting down a Messerschmitt Bf.110 on 15th August 1940.  Just visible beneath the cockpit of the Hurricane is his mascot, Figaro, shown kicking a swastika.  His aircraft was also easily identifiable by the red flash on its nose, a feature that was retained even when P2798 was painted all black for its night fighter role. Gleed scored many victories before being shot down and killed whilst flying a Spitfire Vc in the Western Desert in April 1943.

Tribute to Flt Lt Ian R Gleed by Ivan Berryman.
 One of the few rules of aerial combat that were established in the First World War was to attack, where possible, with the sun behind you, thus using the element of surprise both to appear as if from nowhere and to blind your opponent to minimise retaliation. Just such a tactic has been successfully employed here as a DH.2 rakes the tail of Staffelfuhrer Hauptmann Rudolf Kleines Kasta 3 LFG Roland C.II as it returns from a patrol in the skies above northern France in 1916. Known affectionately as The Whale, the C.II was extensively streamlined and the positioning of the cockpits and wing cut-outs afforded both the pilot and observer unequalled views in all directions. Power was supplied by a 160hp Mercedes D.III engine and armament was a 7.92mm Spandau in front of the pilot and a 7.92mm Parabellum for the observer.

Out Of The Sun - LFG Roland C.II by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
 With 39 confirmed victories to his credit, Major John Gilmour is also recognised as the joint highest scoring pilot on the Martinsyde G.100 Elephant, an unusual score given the poor performance of this aircraft in one-on-one combat. He was awarded the DSO, MC and 2 Bars during the course of his flying career and in 1917 was posted to 65 Squadron as Flight Commander flying Sopwith Camels. On 1st July 1918, he downed three Fokker D.VIIs, a Pfalz and an Albatros D.V in the space of just 45 minutes.  In 1918 he was promoted to the rank of major and posted to command 28 Squadron in Italy, staying with the trusty Camel, but he did not add further to his score, although his final un-confirmed total may have been as high as 44. He is depicted here claiming his second kill on 24th September 1916 when he destroyed a Fokker E.1 whilst flying Elephant No 7284.

Major John Gilmour by Ivan Berryman. (GL)

BIG SALE!

Exclusive offers on Philip West prints, only available from this site

Click Here
FREE SHIPPING!

Selected prints with Free Shipping

Click Here to see all free shipping items!
Spitfire Patrol by Philip West (AP)

Spitfire Patrol by Philip West (AP)
Price : 250.00
FREE SHIPPING!

Signatures

Some popular pilot and aircrew signatures from our database of over 2,000 signatures!


Geoff Wellum


William Overstreet


John Moffat

 

 

Click a button below to get started!

 

Philip West is recognised as one of the world's finest aviation artists. Collectors of his original oil paintings span the globe, many waiting patiently for his next breathtaking canvas to appear. With some twenty-eight limited editions behind him, a packed painting and personal appearance schedule both in the UK and America ahead, Philip's popularity is soaring.

Noted for his passion for detail, Philip has won many accolades for his paintings, not the least of which was the prestigious Duane Whitney Award for Excellence at the 1997 American Society of Aviation Artists Exhibition.

His work is inspired by and reflects his fascination for aircraft through the ages. Philip's knowledge of aircraft and the accuracy of his work combine to record a moment in history so perfectly, that both collectors and admirers of his work are able to feel a real sense of the excitement and drama that his work portrays.

When he is not on location or attending special events Philip lives and works with his wife Alice, and family, in a beautiful village deep in the Wiltshire countryside.

 

Aviation History Timeline : 30th May
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
30May1942Leslie Manser of No.50 Squadron RAF was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross
30May1975Reed Landis, a WW1 Ace with 10.00 victories, died on this day
30May1989Former British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. J. H. CdeG(F) DFM Lacey of 501 Squadron, Passed away.
30May1989James Lacey, a WW2 Ace with 28.00 victories, died on this day
30May1989Squadron Leader Ginger Lacey DFM, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
30May2008Major Robert M Barkey, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
30May2008Robert Barkey, a WW2 Ace with 5.00 victories, died on this day

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email: cranstonorders - at - outlook.com



Subscribe to our newsletterReturn to Front Page